IT Accessibility 101 (Version 2.0)

The Accessibility 101 course is intended to increase understanding and awareness of accessibility, as well as in the context of information technology (I.T.).  Because accessibility work is a responsibility shared among campus citizens, creating a common language and shared understanding of basic accessibility concepts provides a critical foundation for everyone.

The course has been redesigned to enhance the learning experience and hands-on opportunities for the learner. The course is self-paced, broken into sections with reviews along the way. Each new section cannot be accessed until the review for the previous section has been visited.

Those who complete the course with 85% or higher are eligible to receive a digital badge which can be displayed on sites such as LinkedIn or Twitter, or placed in a badge/e-portfolio platform.

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Web Accessibility Evaluation for Technical Users (Version 2.0)

This three-part course offers three sessions progressively through:

  • Session 1 – Accessibility Impacts and Features
  • Session 2 – Testing Tools and Methodology
  • Session 3 – Reporting Issues

The overview of the three sessions illustrates how accessibility impacts on users with disabilities using digital and assistive technologies. Participants will learn how to test website applications with simple testing tools and how to identify common accessibility issues in a website. They will also learn how to create a report for themselves, clients and for the final exam.

Instructor

Lori Lane, M.Ed.
Disability Resources and Education Services
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Audience

  • Web developers
  • Web designers
  • Quality assurance specialists

What you will learn

  • Accessibility impacts on users
  • Different types of testing tools
  • Common web accessibility features/issues
  • Reporting of different issues

Objectives

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the experience people with disabilities have using digital technologies, including the use of assistive technologies
  • Understand the capabilities and limitations of the following tools in understanding the accessibility of a website:
    • Keyboard testing
    • Object Inspector
    • Favelets
    • Bookmarklets
    • Color contrast tools
    • Web developer tools
    • Caption testing
  • Evaluate a website for following accessibility features:
    • Keyboard operation
    • Link texts
    • Basic landmarks
    • Headings
    • Images
    • Forms
    • Colors
    • Captioning

Student Participation

  • Interactive synchronous lecture with instructor using Blackboard Collaborate.
  • In-class participation where students will visit websites and videos and view examples of accessibility errors.
  • Badging exam and example websites to be provided by the instructor.

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Web Accessibility Evaluation for Non-Technical Users (Version 2.0)

Audience

  • Administrators and managers
  • Support staff
  • Instructional designers
  • Content editors

What you will learn

  • Accessibility impacts on users
  • Different types of testing tools
  • Common web accessibility features/issues
  • Reporting of different issues

Objectives

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the experience people with disabilities have using digital technologies, including the use of assistive technologies
  • Understand the capabilities and limitations of the following tools in understanding the accessibility of a website:
    • Keyboard testing
    • Object Inspector
    • Favelets
    • Bookmarklets
    • Color contrast tools
    • Caption testing
  • Evaluate a website for following accessibility features:
    • Keyboard operation
    • Link texts
    • Headings
    • Images
    • Forms
    • Colors
    • Captioning

Student Participation

  • Interactive synchronous lecture with instructor using Blackboard Collaborate.
  • In-class participation where students will visit websites and videos and view examples of accessibility errors.
  • Badging exam and example websites to be provided by the instructor.

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Accessibility 101 – 2017 (Version 1.0)

The Accessibility 101 course is intended to increase understanding and awareness of accessibility, as well as in the context of information technology (I.T.).  Because accessibility work is a responsibility shared among campus citizens, creating a common language and shared understanding of basic accessibility concepts provides a critical foundation for everyone.

Posted in Uncategorized

Web Design: Landmarks, Headings, Page Titles and Navigation (Version 2.0)

The usability of a website is closely related to the visual layout and organization of the information on each web page. For website to be accessible to people with disabilities the layout, organization and structure must be represented through the proper use ARIA landmarks and HTML headings. Participants will learn about how to represent the visual layout and semantic structure of a web page with the use of ARIA Landmarks and HMTL Headings (H1-H6) to meet Section 508 and W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0. The course will cover accessible web page titling strategies to identify both website and sub-page information and the different ways to provide a means to skip over repetitive navigation links to get to the main content of a web page. The course will help participants understand the Section 508 and W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 requirements that apply to titling, use of headings and landmarks. The course will also cover the techniques to meet the WCAG 2.0 website navigation requirements.

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Web Design: Introduction to Accessible Web Widgets with ARIA (Version 2.0)

Javascript, HTML and CSS are often used to create custom interactive web widgets for web pages and cloud applications. Some common examples of web widgets include: pull down menus for website navigation, rotating image sliders to present news and events, and combo boxes with options based on user history or profiles. The W3C Accessible Rich Internet Application (ARIA) specification provides a means to describe the behaviors and keyboard interaction of the widgets to users of assistive technologies. Participants will learn the basic concepts of creating accessible widgets including how to include keyboard interaction, keyboard focus styling, selecting appropriate ARIA roles, properties and states to make sure widgets are accessible and accurately describe keyboard interaction. The course will review the design patterns of several common ARIA enabled widgets and participants will build their own accessible widgets as part of the course. The course will be based on the design patterns and techniques of the W3C ARIA Authoring Practices guidelines. The course will also help participants understand the Section 508 and W3C WCAG 2.0 requirements that apply to scripting and interactive custom widgets.

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Web Design: Web Accessibility Evaluation Basics (Version 1.0)

This three-part course offers three sessions progressively through:

  • Session 1 – Concept of Accessibility and Types of Users
  • Session 2 – Requirements and Accessibility Impacts on Users
  • Session 3 – Testing Tools and Website Evaluation Basics

The overview of the three sessions illustrates how accessibility impacts on users with disabilities using digital and assistive technologies and how the requirements, Section 508 and WCAG 2.0 will make the digital technology to be more accessible. Furthermore, participants will learn how to test website applications with simple testing tools and how to identify common accessibility issues in a website.

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Web Design: Form Controls and Links (Version 2.0)

Links and form controls are the fundamental interactive elements of the web and it is important to understand what makes them accessible and usable to people with disabilities. Participants will learn how the accessible name for a link is computed and how to use W3C Accessible Rich Internet Application (ARIA) techniques to provide programmatic context to improve the meaning of a link to meet WCAG 2.0 requirements. Participants will learn how to label form controls with standard label elements and with ARIA techniques, and how the different techniques affect user interaction.  The course will demonstrate the history of techniques for providing accessible error feedback, and the latest techniques available using ARIA. The course will include techniques to provide a consistent visual keyboard focus indicator across browsers for links and form controls. Participants will understand the Section 508 and W3C WCAG 2.0 requirements that apply to links and form controls.

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